James Bruce Bussel, M.D.

Pediatric Hematology-Oncology

James Bruce Bussel, M.D.

Named one of New York Magazine's Best Doctors, 2012
Named one of New York's Super Doctors, 2012


Dr. James Bussel received his medical degree (M.D.) from Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons after completing a B.S. at Yale University.  He completed his residency in pediatrics at Cincinnati Children's Hospital in Ohio, returning to New York City to undertake a joint fellowship in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital where he was chief fellow in 1980-81.   He is board certified in Pediatrics and in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology.
 
Research
 
In 1981, the Platelet Disorders Center initiated the first studies of intravenous gammaglobulin in the treatment of ITP in the United States. This was followed by studies in ITP with IV anti-D (Winrho) beginning in 1987, rituximab in 2000, and the newly licensed thrombopoietic agents in 2002.   More than two hundred publications on ITP in children and adults have followed, including six first or second authored articles in the New England Journal of Medicine and two in the Lancet. In 2003, Dr. Bussel was selected as one of 5 representatives of the American Society of Hematology (SPARKII) to meet with representatives of the NIH to plan research directions in hematology for the future.

Adults have worse ITP than do children. Therefore, trials and studies at the center have increasingly included them with the first publication on the treatment of adults in 1983. The center is the country's and the world's leader in clinical trials of refractory ITP in exploring novel agents including those that modulate the immune system.
 
Another area of Dr. Bussel's special expertise is the treatment of fetuses affected by alloimmune thrombocytopenia. This is a platelet incompatibility between the parents that affects the fetus. Treatment can be given during the pregnancy to the mother to increase the platelet count in the fetus, prevent a fetal brain hemorrhage, and allow for a healthy baby to be born whose thrombocytopenia will then disappear within weeks.

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